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May 1, 2008

Posted by andrea in the IA/BA world.
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I wrote this back in June 07, when I was having problems with an Agile dev team… plus a large dose of comments in italic from the present (and grammatical-tense changes…hmm,never realized the double meaning of “tense”…am I mis-spelling it?)….

I’ll use the old “house building” analogy: My role was to be the table saw on a construction crew – use it when you need it, and then turn it off. Worse, I became the tool who needed to anticipate when one of the carpenters blindly threw a piece of wood in the air, and I was expected to catch it, cut it to size, and hand it back…so they continued on the “real” work. Who, honestly, wants to work like that? Could you find someone who’d be happy being THAT disengaged from their end product? (I know, how Marxist of me).

The only bright spot of the project was the client – he and I had wonderful, thought-provoking conversations, and traded ideas, and wrestled with direction, and thinking. I valued his insight, and I like to think he mine. There hasn’t been another person to challenge me in the way I need to be challenged (aside from answering questions on-the-fly and having had to refer people back to my documentation – that’s another story). I grew, and learned, and worked with some amazing people who are open with their ideas, kicked my butt and pushed me further where I need to go. And to go backwards into “just do some wireframes, you” is a situation that isn’t challenging anymore.

business analysis and analysts are not your waitstaff…taking orders of the next piece of technology you think will work. Um, we are business. analysts. We offer an analysis. of your business. We are insane, in our de-construction of concepts and ideas into achievable goals, for a reason. We like matrices (ahhh). We seek connections, and flow. Our favourite question is “why?” We ask it of each other, and ourselves, all the time (it’s a total meta-BA thing when I post). We want a logical conclusion to *everything* we do.

I’m at a place now where I think I do have this intangible geek knowledge – experience, insight, and large dose of humility, and goofiness. People seem to want it, or recognize it. I’m really lucky. Not a joiner: not a developer, not a creative, not a PM, not a sales dude – i’m a little of everything. Which explains why I can’t join anything, including a dog-walking group.:-)

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